Robots and AI Vehicles to Participate in Tokyo Olympics 2020

Robots and AI Vehicles to Participate in Tokyo Olympics 2020
As 2020 approaches, Japan is working on how to make the Olympics convenient, comfortable and absolutely hassle-free for every life that will be present in Tokyo throughout the period of the event. There is no doubt that the Olympics will increase the population of  the city, making it far more congested than it ever was, and in light of this, while the fans of the Olympics will be looking forward to the performances of their favourite athletes, the city of Tokyo is making ways for the assistance of Robots and AI facilities in organizing the games.
(Source: WorldSkate)
As 2020 approaches, Japan is working on how to make the Olympics convenient, comfortable and absolutely hassle-free for every life that will be present in Tokyo throughout the period of the event. There is no doubt that the Olympics will increase the population of  the city, making it far more congested than it ever was, and in light of this, while the fans of the Olympics will be looking forward to the performances of their favourite athletes, the city of Tokyo is making ways for the assistance of Robots and AI facilities in organizing the games.
The 2020 Olympics will see Tokyo adopting athlete tracking that is powered by Artificial Intelligence, cloud-based broadcasting and 5G network in operation. In the past, vehicles that are remotely controlled have been used to bring athletic equipment such as hammers, javelin, shot put and so on to the event centres. But Tokyo 2020 will use AI-powered vehicles to convey these sporting items. This way, humans are only required on standby to load athletic items into the vehicle, leaving the rest for the robots to take care of. This idea will reduce the amount of time it takes athletes to retrieve items and minimizes the number of humans that will be involved in the process.
More so, Field Support Robots (FSR) will be used during the event. Field robots are mobile robots that operate in dynamic, unstructured environments. These types of robots are not programmed to be stereotypically monotony, that is, repeating the same task over and over. But rather they are adaptive and responsive, and they can work in any environment, even an uncharted territory. During the Olympics, the FSR will use cameras and sensors to determine the optimum route when travelling to a particular location while the FSR are capable of avoiding obstacles they encounter.
For improved accessibility, a Human Support Robot (HSR) will also be available to guide spectators to their seats while a Delivery Support Robot (DSR) will bring items such as food, drinks and merchandize to them where they are seated. This will help improve accessibility of the spectators and prevent mobility restrictions due to the surging of crowd.
Furthermore, Toyota has built a robot mascot responsible for welcoming guests to the Olympic venues. The robot uses facial recognition technology to identify people who are visitors and the robots can respond to various expressions using its eyes and the miniature joint units, meaning that the robots can display a range of physical movement.
There is the T-HR3, a Toyota’s third-generation humanoid robot that mimics the movements of mascot robot while in a totally different location. It also provides images and sounds to bring the atmosphere of the Olympic Stadium to spectators in an entirely different location. Toyota’s focus on mobility is not only physical but also virtual, as it will be possible for fans to have a close conversation with their favourite world famous athletes or even have a high-five with them.
(T-HR3 Robot displayed by Toyota; Source: TechCrunch) 
 
During the 2020 Olympics, Toyota also intends to get athletes and officials around the city using autonomous vehicles. There will be availability of autonomous scooters that could take passengers around and is capable of detecting obstacles from afar using lasers. Panasonic, among other leading electronics corporation in the world, has tested a new color-coded travel map at the Haneda airport. This reason for this is to show popular destinations to visitors. There is also smartphone application that translates texts into several other languages in order to overcome languages barrier. Street hubs will also provide public Wi-Fi networks for everyone while displaying advertising as well as emergency information.
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Dammy Michael

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Dammy Michael enjoys writing stories around technologies

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